Rent-a-Chicken® has been featured in a number of magazines, newspapers and websites since our inception.

Here are a few of our favorites.

Rentals That Let You Fly the Coop

Chickens are soulful animals, Phil Tompkins says. “They walk up to you and talk to you,” he says. “They want to interact with you. They’re like a cat or dog, except they’re a chicken.”

Click here to read the full article.

Kids Up North: Rent-a-Chicken in Traverse City Makes Urban Farming Child’s Play

MyNorth: How exactly does one get into the business of renting chickens?

Leslie Suitor (Mother Hen): Well, for us, it happened like a snowball. We live in the country and already had chickens. When the Traverse City ordinance changed last year (allowing up to four hens per city parcel), friends started asking us a ton of questions about how to raise them. There was a lot of interest, but people were leery too, especially about how to care for baby chicks. We did have some friends take the plunge—and they spent a lot of money to do so—and it got me thinking. What if we made chickens available that weren’t babies? That would eliminate a lot of the costs. And that led to wondering if we should just rent chickens, let people check them out for the summer and see where it goes. Before I knew it, we had a basement full of baby chicks all winter long.

Click here to read the full article.

Love Chickens But Hate Commitment? Try Renting

“Everyone loves a summer chicken. But come February, when you’re schlepping food and water across the snowy yard, getting your PJs wet, cursing your kids who promised to help, and not getting any eggs for your trouble, the romance of the backyard chicken may start to wane.”

Enter Rent-a-Chicken. Leslie Suitor started the company in Traverse City, Michigan as a way to spare you from cold weather trauma. ”We get hellacious winters up here,” she said. “Who wants to slog through snowdrifts to get to your coop?”

Click here to read the full article.

Connecting Kids to Agriculture

Grab a pair of boots and get ready for a taste of farm life. The Traverse City business Rent-A-Chicken is connecting people nationwide with the local agriculture scene.

Each spring, Rent-A-Chicken Founders Leslie and Mark Suitor start delivering chickens to kids and adults who will take care of them for the summer. “This has been one of the most fun things I’ve ever done,” Leslie says. “When we show up to drop off the chickens, we’re like Santa Claus. I don’t know who is more excited, the kids or the adults.”

Click here to read the full article.

Finally, You Can Rent a Farm Animal

Sheep, chickens, and even falcons have joined the sharing economy.

Fowl to fork: Rent chickens, get freshest eggs in Sacramento

You’ve heard of renting cars and homes, but chickens? It’s a new program that’s available now in Sacramento and will bring you some of the freshest eggs in the area.

Click here to watch the video.

Davis Farm Lets People Rent Chickens For Their Backyards

A farm in Davis has started a new program allowing people to rent chickens to get a first-timer’s taste of backyard chicken farming.

For those still trying to find a place in the pecking order of backyard chicken farming, this is for you. Flyway Farm in Davis has hatched a new idea where you can rent a hen and try before you buy—in case you chicken out.

Click here to watch the video.

Rent-A-Chicken Gives Oklahomans Taste Of Farm Life

Most everyone would love fresh eggs every day but don’t have the means of raising chickens.

Well, thanks to one woman, now you can rent them.

Click here to watch the Video.

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Rent-a-Chicken® has been featured in a number of magazines, newspapers and websites since our inception. Here are a few of our favorites.

News on 6: Tulsa Photo Exhibit Tells Tale Of The ‘Wicked Witch’

Program Lets Oklahomans Get Taste Of Farm Life By Renting Chickens

Watch video…


Fowl to fork: Rent chickens, get freshest eggs in Sacramento
Watch video…

Davis Farm Lets People Rent Chickens For Their Backyards
Watch video…

Jack’s Journal  chicken_son_final

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Rentals That Let You Fly the Coop

Ms. Suitor, who founded her company in 2009 with her husband, Mark, saw several problems bedeviling chicken owners. One was that they were often accidentally buying rooster chicks, which, of course, did not produce the desired eggs and made a disquieting noise. Some owners also incorrectly assumed that they would start eating organic, farm-fresh eggs for breakfast the morning after they brought home chicks, not realizing it can take several months or more for hens to mature and begin producing them.”

Read More. . .

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Turn your castle into a coop: Rent a chicken coop for $250

The first time my neighbors asked me to take care of their chickens while they went away for the weekend, the temperature dropped into the single digits overnight. The hens didn’t freeze like I feared, but by morning their hanging water dispenser was an airborne ice cube.

My attempt to thaw the thing out and refill it was comical. An hour and a few frostbitten fingers later, I got two eggs out of the ordeal and ate the freshest omelet I’ve ever had.

I love connecting with my food as much as the next urban locavore, and fresh eggs really do taste better, but I might not be cut out for four-season chicken farming. Turns out there’s another option: renting.

That’s right… there’s such a thing as Rent-A-Chicken. (This is the company’s actual name.)

Read More. . .

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Love Chickens But Hate Commitment? Try Renting

“Everyone loves a summer chicken. But come February, when you’re schlepping food and water across the snowy yard, getting your PJs wet, cursing your kids who promised to help, and not getting any eggs for your trouble, the romance of the backyard chicken may start to wane.”

Enter Rent-a-Chicken. Leslie Suitor started the company in Traverse City, Michigan as a way to spare you from cold weather trauma. ”We get hellacious winters up here,” she said. “Who wants to slog through snowdrifts to get to your coop?”

Read More. . .

mynorth-color

Kids Up North: Rent-a-Chicken in Traverse City Makes Urban Farming Child’s Play

MyNorth: How exactly does one get into the business of renting chickens?

Leslie Suitor (Mother Hen): Well, for us, it happened like a snowball. We live in the country and already had chickens. When the Traverse City ordinance changed last year (allowing up to four hens per city parcel), friends started asking us a ton of questions about how to raise them. There was a lot of interest, but people were leery too, especially about how to care for baby chicks. We did have some friends take the plunge—and they spent a lot of money to do so—and it got me thinking. What if we made chickens available that weren’t babies? That would eliminate a lot of the costs. And that led to wondering if we should just rent chickens, let people check them out for the summer and see where it goes. Before I knew it, we had a basement full of baby chicks all winter long.

Read More. . .